EKU Update HomeA Newsletter for Eastern Kentucky University Faculty & Staff
Volume 15 • Number 9
Dec 08, 2014
spacer Printable VersionPrint this issuespacer
In this issue:

EKUpdate is produced biweekly by the Division of Public Relations & Marketing.
Karen Lynn, editor
 
More News
Eastern will recognize 1,424 degree candidates and present honorary degrees to Trey Grayson and Jon Carloftis at its annual Fall Commencement ceremonies on Saturday, Dec. 13.

Hired in 2003 as dean of the College of Justice & Safety at Eastern, Dr. Allen Ault is currently the longest tenured dean at EKU.

Soon, that will change.

“With due consideration, I have decided to retire effective June 31, 2015,” he wrote in an email to CJ&S faculty and staff on Nov. 3. “I hold the students, faculty and staff of this College in high esteem. You have made the 12 years I have served as dean the most fulfilling and enjoyable ones of my career and life.”

A book by Dr. Carolyn Dupont, assistant professor of history, has earned the annual Frank S. and Elizabeth D. Brewer Prize from the American Society of Church History.

It took just one year for five EKU faculty members to write and publish “Shadows Over Banshee Ridge,” their first collabo-novel about a fictional eastern Kentucky county beset by corruption – and rival tribes of bigfoots.

EKU, recognized as one of the top 125 STEM (Science-Technology-Engineering-Mathematics) colleges and universities in the nation, is partnering with five area high schools to advance among teens awareness of and preparation for STEM fields.


President Benson has been appointed to represent Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) institutions on the nine-member NCAA Honors Committee. Benson is the first Ohio Valley Conference president to serve on the committee.

Eastern is welcoming increasing numbers of the best and brightest students, thanks to a revamped model for merit-based scholarships that gives equal weight to ACT and SAT scores and high school GPA.

<i>From left: Dr. Elgie McFayden, KSU grant co-director; Dr. Raymond Burse, KSU president; Dr. Wayne D. Andrews, MSU president; Dr. Allen Ault, dean, EKU College of Justice & Safety; Dr. Michael W. Hail, MSU grant co-director; Dr. Murray Bessette, MSU co-director; and Dr. Mike Collier, EKU grant co-director.</i>
From left: Dr. Elgie McFayden, KSU grant co-director; Dr. Raymond Burse, KSU president; Dr. Wayne D. Andrews, MSU president; Dr. Allen Ault, dean, EKU College of Justice & Safety; Dr. Michael W. Hail, MSU grant co-director; Dr. Murray Bessette, MSU co-director; and Dr. Mike Collier, EKU grant co-director.
Administrators, faculty and students from EKU, Morehead State University and Kentucky State University were on hand Wednesday, Dec. 3, for an announcement of a grant and partnership agreement for the Bluegrass State Intelligence Community Center of Academic Excellence.

(Stephanie Cole/Public Relations)
(Stephanie Cole/Public Relations)
Dr. Norman Powell, director for diversity initiatives and programs in the College of Education and associate professor in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, was among those attending the recent Diversity Breakfast. The annual event is hosted by the University Diversity Committee.

Students from Video Production I and Video Production III will showcase their best creations from the fall semester at a one-hour event on campus. The Fall 2014 Projected Visions will be held at 11 a.m., Thursday, Dec. 11, in Powell Underground.


This fall, Corbin Middle School’s 7th grade science classes investigated “The Mysteries of Moore’s Branch” with the help of Education student mentors from EKU’s Corbin campus. The innovative “SEEing Science in Appalachia” project, from which this collaboration grew, started with a 2012 National Science Foundation (NSF) grant in EKU’s Honors Program that involved outreach and “hands-on” science project mentoring by EKU Honors Program students in Richmond’s Madison Middle School and Model Laboratory School. The Corbin outreach this fall represents a first step in sharing this program with students and teachers across our service region. On Oct. 7, Corbin Middle School science teachers Corean Wells and TeNeal Wilcox (center) and their students shared their project posters with the community at their “Mysteries of Moore’s Branch” showcase event at Corbin Middle School. Also in attendance were, from left, EKU Corbin faculty project coordinators Mary Lamar, EKU Chemistry Dept.; Sharon Ball, EKU Corbin, Curriculum and Instruction; Connie Hodge, EKU Corbin, Curriculum and Instruction; Judy Smith, EKU Corbin, Curriculum and Instruction; and their students who had served as project mentors for the middle school students. The project posters covered all aspects of the biology, chemistry, geology, geography and history of the Moore’s Branch watershed—a small creek that adjoins the Corbin Middle School campus in downtown Corbin.

(Terrence Humphrey/Public Relations)<br><i>Dr. Erik Liddell, Chautauqua Lecture Coordinator and Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages and Humanities</i>
(Terrence Humphrey/Public Relations)
Dr. Erik Liddell, Chautauqua Lecture Coordinator and Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages and Humanities
Dr. Erik Liddell, assistant professor of foreign languages and humanities, and recently named Chautauqua Lecture Coordinator, is featured in this ongoing series designed to allow EKU leaders and others in prominent positions to discuss their roles, as well as campus issues. Liddell, who joined the faculty in 2009, spent a year at Kansas State exploring physics and engineering, then switched gears and went on to pursue and complete a bachelor’s degree (honors) in liberal studies at Brock University (Ontario), and master’s and doctoral degrees in comparative literature at the University of Toronto.